savory

A Healthy Mexican Brunch

Thought I'd share a pic from a light brunch we made and enjoyed with friends on our lovely deck overlooking a beautiful lake this Easter. Since it was Easter, I was feeling a bit sentimental and wanted to dye some eggs, so I dyed them naturally using beets. (We have a red food-coloring allergy in our household, so natural dyes are a must.) Next in the image (clockwise) is fresh guacamole (tip: put the pit in the guac to help it stay green), fresh green salsa, banana bread made with ground oats, chocolate, and pecans, raw jicama (my new favorite veggie) and carrots, tuna and olive oil, and yogurt dill dip. We also had baked tostadas (for eating with the guac, salsa and tuna), fresh squeezed local orange juice, tropical fruit salad, and delicious Chiapas coffee. ¬°Que rico! How delicious! (The literal translation is more like "how rich" but here they tend to use this expression for anything that's really good.)

The dill dip is something I enjoyed as a child in the summer with fresh carrots. (I think it may be a Ukrainian thing, because my Mom and Grandma would make a similar dip.) I got my Mom to bring me dried dill from Canada just so that I could make this dip to enjoy with the sweet local carrots. This is how I make it using local ingredients:

Yogurt Garlic Dill Dip

I always free-style this dip, so feel free to play with the amounts of ingredients. I remember there being some sour cream in my Mom's recipe, but I prefer yogurt. Mix together, to your taste, approximately:

  • 1 - 1 1/2 c natural full fat (or Balkan style) yogurt (you can strain some of the yogurt liquids if you like in order to make a thicker dip - in the same manner you would make tzatziki)
  • 1 medium clove of fresh garlic (crushed and finely minced - start with one, then add more to taste)
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt (start with this, then add more to taste)
  • 2 tsp dried dill (or 2 Tbsp finely chopped fresh dill)
  • a bit of lime (or lemon) juice and/or a bit of finely grated zest (to taste)

Store covered in the fridge. Allow to sit overnight before serving - especially if using dried dill. Keeps for about a week. Enjoy with raw veggies.

Ginger Miso Peanut Butter Cookies


The combination of miso and peanut butter is one that's intrigued me for a while. I've experimented with different versions of miso peanut butter cookies for some time now... and recently: miso, peanut butter, and ginger - wow! The combination of sweet, savory, and spicy is pretty awesome :-) A Japanese take on classic peanut butter cookies:

Recipe: Ginger Miso Peanut Butter Cookies

Health notes: These addictive exotic treats just happen to be dairy-free and gluten-free. Packed with peanuts, these cookies have a substantial amount of protein, minerals, and healthy fat. Ginger is great for the immune system and digestion, and cinnamon has a bunch of health benefits, including the ability to help moderate blood-sugar levels. These cookies are really sweet, and by sweet I mean delicious *and* sugary, though they're not as sugary-sweet as traditional peanut butter cookies.